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Anti-Semitic Cartoons

The Economist publishes an anti-Semitic cartoon that claims Jewish control over the American congress

A fairly factual article was published in the Economist on Jan. 18, 2014 titled “Negotiating with Iran: A big gap to close.” But the article also included an anti-Semitic cartoon. Peter Schrank’s cartoon depicts President Obama with his ankle shackled to the Judaised seal of the US Congress, thereby prevented from shaking hands with Iran’s President Rouhani.

The cartoon has no connection to the article itself since the article does not mention AIPAC, the Israel Lobby, or indeed Israel (bar a passing reference in brackets to Benjamin Netanyahu). There is no reference to anyone preventing US President Obama from speaking with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani.

Arab Anti-Semitic cartoons leading up to the Six Day War in 1967 saw Jews as weak and cowardly

 

[Cartoon above is: “Israel is attempting to achieve balance of power with the Arabs. The Arab reply: This will be the only balance.” Egyptian review, Roz-el-Yussef, February 14, 1966.]

Anti-Israel cartoons have been gracing the pages of Arab newspapers and magazines for decades, their popularity rising every time there is a game-changing event in the Israeli-Arab relations.

But prior to the Six Day War in 1967, the depiction of Jews in traditional Middle Eastern anti-Semitism was as a nation that was weak and cowardly. This was a theme in traditional Muslim views of Jews, reinforced by the teachings of modern European anti-Semitism.

As a result, the Arab masses expected Israel to fall and the Jews to be massacred without too much trouble. Israel's military performance in the previous two Arab-Israeli wars was discounted by the invented claims that it was European powers that had assisted the Jews in these conflicts.

 

Munich-based newspaper publishes caricature of Israel as horned monster

The German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung (SZ) ran a cartoon on July 2, 2013 depicting Israel as an ugly monster (see above). A young woman is serving food to a wild, hungry, and horned monster sitting at a table and ready to devour food with a fork and carving knife. The caption reads, “Germany is serving. For decades, Israel has been provided with weapons, in part for free. Israel's enemies see the country as a voracious Moloch. Peter Beinart laments that it has come to this.” [The cartoon was published alongside a favorable review of two books that are highly critical of Israel, including a 2012 book by Peter Beinart.]

 

Norwegian daily Dagbladet is a publisher of anti-Semitic cartoons

The Norwegian daily Dagbladet, Norway's second largest tabloid newspaper and the third largest newspaper overall, published a caricature of what appeared to be Jews torturing a baby during a circumcision in its May 28, 2013 edition. The newspaper has a history of anti-Semitic cartoons though they defend their actions by either claiming that the particular cartoon they published had nothing to do with Judaism or that the cartoon was legitimate criticism against Israel.

The cartoon depicts a bearded man wearing a black hat and black coat holding what appears to be religious book sticking a fork into the head of a blood-soaked baby. Another unseen person cuts off the baby’s foot with a bolt cutter as a woman in a long-sleeve shirt shows the officers another blood-spattered book and tells them: “Abuse? No, this tradition is central to our belief.” The police officers apologize “for interrupting.”

Jos Collignon publishes anti-semitic cartoons for the Dutch newspaper De Volkskrant

 

An anti-Semitic political cartoon by the Dutchman Jos Collignon was published by the Dutch newspaper De Volkskrant on April 20, 2013. Collignon has provided cartoons three times a week for the newspaper since 1980.

In the cartoon, Israel and North Korea are compared regarding their possession of nuclear weapons. The cartoon, however, can be seen as clearly anti-Semitic because Collignon characterizes the Israeli as a Hasidic Jew, a secret sneak, presented with crooked nose, long beard in typical 19th century dress with black hat and long black clothes. In so doing, his depiction is reminiscent of the period of Nazi Germany when Julius Streicher made similar cartoons in the anti-Semitic publication of Der Sturmer, a favorite magazine of the European anti-Semites.

The anti-Semitic cartoons of Al Jazeera

 

Al Jazeera published an unmistakably anti-Semitic cartoon to describe US President Barack Obama's speech in Jerusalem on March 21, 2013. It is titled "Obama calls on Arabs to normalize relations with Israel."

The cartoon displays two historic stereotypes against the Jews. We see a representation of the crucifixion of Jesus Christ by the Jews but this time it is Mother Palestine on the cross. Hence Jews are again G-d killers but this time they are killing the holy Palestine. A sprinkling of blood from the figure and the obviously Jewish killer with blood on his hand symbolizes the classical Jewish hate theme of the Blood Libel where blood is claimed to be important for Jewish religious rituals.

The cartoon satirizes the words of President Obama calling for peace between Jews and Arabs. Obviously, the reader is expected to conclude that it is impossible to make peace with such a monster as the Jew.

Britain’s Sunday Times publishes an anti-Semitic cartoon on International Holocaust Memorial Day

 

Gerald Scarfe, a respected cartoonist, revealed his hatred for Israel and the Jewish people in a cartoon appearing in Britain’s Sunday Times on Jan. 27, 2013, coinciding with the annual International Holocaust Memorial Day. This day was designated by the United Nations in 2005 as a yearly memorial day for the victims of the Holocaust - 6 million Jews and millions of other victims of Nazi Germany during World War II.

The cartoon by Gerald Scarfe is titled Israeli Elections Will Cementing Peace Continue? It depicts a hideous looking big-nosed PM of Israel Benjamin Netanyahu scowling as he waves a blood-covered trowel. He is laying bricks in a wall in which distraught-looking Palestinian men, women and children are trapped. The wall is cemented with the blood of those in the wall as blood is oozing from the cracks between the bricks.

 

Brazilian cartoonist Carlos Latuff utilizes "Judeophobic stereotypes” in his attacks on Israel

 

Brazilian cartoonist Carlos Latuff was listed by The Simon Wiesenthal Center as No. 3 in its 2012 Top Ten Anti-Semitic/Anti-Israel Slurs for “slandering Prime Minister of Israel [Binyamin] Netanyahu. The cartoon shows Netanyahu profiting politically by squeezing votes out of the body of a dead Arab child in Gaza (the attack was carried out within 2 months from the elections in Israel).

Anti-Semitic cartoons are a regular feature on “The Ugly Truth” website

 

Mark Glenn’s website “The Ugly Truth” highlights many recent Western anti-Semitic cartoons. Glenn uses hate cartoons as a means to dress up his anti-Semitic message. His message is based on stereotypical views about Judaism, conspiracy theories about Jewish control, a twisted and distorted view regarding Christian theology, and pro-Islamist sentiments. For further details about the Glenn website, see the previous article by fighthatred.com by hitting here.

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